Sabbatical Part 5

The winter edition:  posters, presentations, and pastries

Yes, you read that right.  First, though, thanks to Romel Hernandez and Reed’s Public Affairs staff for the article on my NSF CAREER award!

Posters2018-thompson-taylor_brill-cancerlinker

four Reed students and alums presented posters on their recent work.  See some of these posters and others on the updated posters page on my website.

  • Current students Sol Taylor-Brill and Kathy Thompson presented their work on CancerLinker – a method to integrate gene expression data from cancer patients in signaling pathway analysis.  They gave a poster at the 2018 Murdock College Science Research Conference in Vancouver, WA.
  • Current student Mattie O’Kelley-Bangsberg presented work from Derek Applewhite’s and my collaboration to find potential regulators of non-muscle myosin II, a protein known to be involved in cellular constriction.  This project involved students from two upper-level biology courses, contributing to both the computational predictions and the experimental validations.  She presented a poster at ASCB/EMBO in San Diego, CA; you can read more in the list of poster abstracts (P3219).
  • Post-baccalaureate Amy Platenkamp presented her work in Derek Applewhite’s lab investigating the regulatory role of the RN-tre protein in non-muscle myosin II’s localization and function.  She also presented a poster at ASCB/EMBO in San Diego, P1104 in the list of poster abstracts.

Presentationsinvalid-paths

I gave a talk at BIBM 2018 on my postdoc’s work that integrates protein localization information in signaling pathway analysis.  Our previous work computed many short paths within a protein-protein interaction network to automatically reconstruct a signaling pathway of interest. While this worked better than other methods, we found that some of the paths were not starting at the membrane of the cell and ending in the nucleus — an assumption we impose on intracellular signaling pathways.  In this paper, we show that constraining the paths with proteins that are in the expected place in the cell produces more accurate pathway reconstructions.

Also, Carleton student Kiran Tomlinson gave an excellent talk on his work with CS professor Layla Oesper on the effect of noise in tumor evolution reconstructions.

Pastries

BIBM 2018 was in Madrid, which was a fantastic place to visit over Spain’s Constitution Day.  The food was amazing – the baked clams at the oldest continuously-operating restaurant in the world, paella Thursday, and the grilled octopus were top-notch.  Then there were the pastries (photos from Mercado de San Miguel):

An adventure to El Escorial also led us to the local chocolate bizcotelas (photo from this blog post, which includes the recipe):

This trip was sabbatical-approved.

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