My Dream Job, Part 4

As of August, I am an Assistant Professor of Biology at Reed College.  In this series of blog posts, I will explain why I chose this environment as my academic landing pad (or launching pad).

Part 4:  Being in a Biology Department changes my perspective.

With one semester under my belt, I took some time this break to reflect on my position at Reed.*  As I begin teaching another round of Introduction to Computational Biology, I will try to articulate why I find my position so exciting.

The students who are taking my classes have had a mixture of backgrounds, but most of them major in the natural sciences.  Up to this point, I have been surrounded by people with strong backgrounds in math and computer science.  As a result, students ask questions that have a completely different underlying motivation than the questions I’ve received in talks and research meetings.  I walk a fine line between oversimplifying the biology in order to describe a problem in computational terms and oversimplifying an algorithm in order to describe how it is applied to a biological concept.  In some ways, this makes teaching class hard.  Talk about inviting the imposter syndrome to step in when you have to answer “I don’t know” in class more than once.  Yet it also makes class engaging, unexpected, and fun.  Add to that an occasional power pose, and teaching is very satisfying.

so-try-that-power-pose

Screenshot from Amy Cuddy’s TED Talk (provided from a blog post by Amy Neuzil)

I am currently one of two tenure-track computer scientists at Reed.  We are at the cusp of establishing a computer science program: students are excited, funds have been acquired, and an active search is underway. I feel like much of the incredibly hard work has been done, and I get to show up for the fun part.**  This momentum has trickled over to the Biology Department through the students I advise and teach.

The other computer scientists at Reed are affiliated with the Math Department.  One might think that being in a different department from the faculty who are “most like me” may make my research life isolating.  Instead, I may just have the best of both worlds.  I get to sit in the same department as my biological collaborators, while networking with faculty in the Math Department to establish computational research collaborations.  Put simply, I love being interdisciplinary.  I deeply appreciate the flexibility that Reed offers in designing my courses to be hybrids of two fields.

My professional identity is quickly becoming steeped in teaching interdisciplinary courses and conducting research across departments.  Over the next few years, my research will undoubtedly become more applications-focused as I co-advise more student projects with Biology faculty. Yet there is enough interest at Reed, from both faculty and students, for me to continue algorithmic research.

*It’s been a while since I posted. Consider it a Spring semester resolution to start posting more.

**This might be naive, but hey, I’m an optimist.

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